Thursday, March 28, 2019

Apathy Therapy


Image result for striatum













Apathy Therapy

Posted by James Rousch on Mar 28, 2019 7:38:49 PM
This is something that I am developing on my own.
We know that those who have learning disabilities are more stressed than those who are not.  It's because we want to do well and we want to show the world that we're more intelligent than people give us credit.

The genesis of this idea occured in 1988 when I was in high school.  I came to realize that the more I cared about my grade, the more I suffered.
I then decide to see what happened if I simply showed up, barely paid attention, and just did the assignment. 

Had it not been for the two fails in Chemistry and in Geometry, I would have probably made Honor Roll, because I graduated high school with a 2.89. 

I literally fell asleep in my other classes and got A's and B's.  Myth and Legend and my history classes were the only ones of interest to me, so i just sat there and took three naps during the class day-and no one cared (you can't fall asleep in P.E.).  They just woke me up when the bell rang.

The first attempts college were disastrous for a number of reasons.  First, there were no online facilities.  I'm Fred Flintstone, okay?  Sue me.  The second reason was that I returned to caring about what I did and that I wanted to make a good impression.

What a total waste of time THAT was.

It was the same frustrating problem which I experienced here, as well, when I first began in 2013.  I currently possess a degree in psychology and I'm working on the next degree.  I currently have a 3.17.  

I don't care.  I don't worry.  Most of the time, I don't even know what day I'm in because of the condition of my hippocampus and my striatum.  According to the NCBI, we still have half of a clue of what the stratium's role in social behavior is with relation to everything else in the brain.

I love it when people tell me to get a calendar, because it does me no good. 

Remember the show Quantum Leap?  Some of the older students do.  Dr. Sam Becket was an experimental time traveller and every time he took another leap, he had no idea where he was.  That's how it is for someone who has problems with their striatum or their hippocampus-or both, if you're me.

This theory still has a long way to go before I can actually complete a paper on it, but all I can tell you is that it works for me.